Publication in Teaching Media Quarterly

I have had an article published in the journal, Teaching Media Quarterly. The article, “Engaging Students of Intersectionality Through Sports Media: Using Women’s Tennis to Teach the Matrix of Domination,” outlines the ways in which sports media can be used to engage students when teaching the concepts of intersectionality. Intersectionality is a particular knowledge project that facilitates our understanding of the lived experiences of those who are affected by race, class, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, nationality, and other identities, and how social inequalities are organized, operate, and can be challenged in the social world. The social struggle is across relationships that have different levels of power. As such, intersectionality has an implicit and often explicit commitment to social justice. The lesson plan outlined here offers a focused look at Patricia Hill Collins’ “matrix of domination” (Collins 2000; 2009) as the explanatory model for seeing and understanding the various levels of power which operate in our society. Using examples from women’s professional tennis, which are highly mediated events, has proven to be effective as explanatory examples as well as increasing student engagement with the sometimes dense theoretical concepts of intersectionality. This article is part of TMQ’s special issue on Intersectionality and Media.

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Published in Fashion, Style & Popular Culture with Rita Liberti

I have had an article published in the journal Fashion, Style & Popular Culture with co-author Rita Liberti, professor of kinesiology at California State University – East Bay. The article, “‘All Frocked Up in Purple’: Rosie Casals, Virginia Slims, and the Politics of Fashion at Wimbledon, 1972,” chronicles the disruption between Wimbledon’s “all-white” clothing rule and Casals’ support of the emerging women’s tennis tour, which was sponsored by Philip Morris as an advertising venue for their Virginia Slims. Casals’ ensemble and the reaction by officials and those in the media symbolized far more than a perceived fashion faux pas by the tennis star. Rather, Casals’ attire and public reaction to it threw into sharp relief debates around equal rights and female independence that raged throughout society during the late 1960s and 1970s. Importantly, the discussions and tensions in relation to Casals’ tennis outfit did not simply mirror these broader conversations, they contributed greatly to them. The dress, like Casals, challenged rules of conduct on the court – and social convention off the court. The attire was, for her, a form of self-expression, which personified a style she was eager to portray to a public not necessarily keen on its exhibition. I am especially proud of this publication because Casals was my coach throughout my pro tennis career.

Book Contract with Routledge

My book, Social Activism in Women’s Tennis: Generations of Politics and Cultural Change, based largely on my dissertation, is under contract with Routledge. Routledge expects delivery of this manuscript in April 2019, with publication afterwards. The book chronicles the lineage of social activism in women’s professional tennis from 1968, when tennis became “open,” to the present. Though the main message of women’s sporting equality has remained the same since 1968, the lineage of social activism in women’s tennis has distinguishable cohorts as women’s tennis gained strength, outside politics changed, and new players entered the space of women’s tennis and others left. Players from previous generations inculcated new players to the culture and politics of women’s tennis at the same time that these new players brought with them new frameworks for understanding the world around them. I am very much looking forward to working with Routledge on this project!

Published in The Palgrave Handbook of Feminisms and Sport, Leisure and Physical Education, 2018

I have had a chapter published in The Palgrave Handbook of Feminism and Sport, Leisure and Physical Education (2018), edited by Louise Mansfield, Jayne Caudwell, Belinda Wheaton, and Beccy Watson. The book chapter, “Judith Butler, Feminism, and the Sociology of Sport,” chronicles the ways in which Butler’s theories of gender performativity have influenced and been used in sociological scholarship on women and LGBT athletes and sport participation.

Joined the Editorial Board at Fashion, Style & Popular Culture

I have joined the Editorial Board at Fashion, Style & Popular Culture! I am very excited about this opportunity to be at the heart of discussions about fashion! I am especially looking forward to encouraging more authors to submit articles on cultural analyses of athletic sportswear, and expanding this area of scholarship.

Here is the description of the journal from the website:

Fashion, Style & Popular Culture is a peer-reviewed journal specifically dedicated to the area of fashion scholarship and its interfacings with popular culture. It was established to provide an interdisciplinary environment for fashion academics and practitioners to publish innovative scholarship in all aspects of fashion and popular culture relating to design, textiles, production, promotion, consumption and appearance-related products and services. Articles related to history, manufacturing, aesthetics, sourcing, marketing, branding, merchandising, retailing, technology, psychological/sociological aspects of dress, style, body image, and cultural identities, as well as purchasing, shopping, and the ways and means consumers construct identity as associated to Fashion, Style & Popular Culture are welcomed.